New technology coming to Wastewater Treatment Plant will kill stench at landfill

CLARKSVILLE, TN (CLARKSVILLE NOW) – The city’s Wastewater Treatment Plant is a single step closer to a $40 million enhance, just one that ought to provide to an conclusion the seasonal stench coming from the landfill in Woodlawn.

The challenge will get $15 million in funding from the American Rescue Plan Act.

“This grant funding will let for essential infrastructure updates that will profit inhabitants and companies throughout the group,” condition Sen. Invoice Powers mentioned in asserting the grant.

The major project: Thermal dryers

The grant will assistance spend for a new six-tale developing that contains thermal dryers that will be built on the present wastewater plant web-site, according to Mark Riggins, typical supervisor for Clarksville Gas & H2o.

Thermal dryers dry out the leftover sludge – a byproduct of the drinking water remedy plant’s purification method – building it easier to correctly dispose of in ways other than just dumping it in the landfill, Riggins mentioned.

Rhonda Fulton, marketing coordinator for Fuel & Water, explained the thermal dryer approach.

“Dewatered wastewater sludge is tumbled in a rotary drum with an included heat source to dry the sludge even additional to make a Class A biosolid. It will then get pelletized to produce a product or service that is less difficult to tackle,” she reported.

Following the sludge is eliminated for processing, the purified liquid is emptied into the Cumberland River, and that has been the apply from the commencing. For people worried about the wellbeing of the river, Riggins mentioned the purified wastewater is cleaner than drinking drinking water.

The leftover sludge has been despatched to the Bi-County Landfill. “The solids on their own, they are dealt with, and there (are) distinctive approaches that you can address those and then dispose of individuals,” Riggins reported.

Injury from the flood

In advance of the 2010 flood, crews at the Wastewater Procedure Plant processed the sludge to a course that they could be utilized to land. “And people use that as fertilizer,” Riggins mentioned. “We hauled it out there to a farm, or anything like that, that they wished, and then we had a … manure spreader that persons could load into that and then distribute on to their farms.”

According to epa.gov, the conclude solution of wastewater treatment plants is generally a Course A humus-like product with out a detectable stages of pathogens that can be applied as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to gardens, food stuff and feed crops.

But Riggins reported the flood prompted major damage to the wastewater plant, and going back to the method of producing fertilizer was heading to be pricey. “That sludge … it’s (known as) biosolids, correct now it is taken to landfill and disposed of.

“Now, back again then when that choice was built, the landfill was willing and content to acquire that,” he said.

But over the previous various a long time, the smell has come to be a challenge. “There (are) a good deal of complaints (from nearby neighbors) about the scent at the landfill,” Riggins explained.

Mark Neblett, executive director for the Bi-County Reliable Squander Administration Program, said they get about five hundreds of sludge a day, and it smells pretty negative.

“The 0ther trouble is, it is tricky to mix with the other squander to get compaction,” Neblett said, noting that if there is far too significantly sludge combined in with the common refuse, it results in a form of quicksand, producing weighty equipment to get stuck.

Long-time period remedy

When wanting for a answer, Riggins explained a marketing consultant recommended Gasoline & Drinking water haul the sludge to a distinctive landfill, at a price of $15 million.

“I just felt like that was a squander of ratepayers’ revenue,” he mentioned. “If I am likely to invest $15 million, I want this to be a little something that is likely to do the job for this plant for eternity.”

Riggins stated that with the new thermal dryers, the output will be decreased by up to 70%, and the procedure will let the sludge to be at the time again be classed to use as fertilizer for farmers.

“We are grateful to the Condition of Tennessee Office of Setting and Conservation for their approval of our grant application,” Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts stated. “The funding will assist solve a lengthy-standing problem at our wastewater cure plant. Credit to Mark Riggins and our staff spouse and children at CGW for their get the job done in securing these cash.”

The following move is for the task to go out to bid, and the project should be full in about two years, Riggins claimed.

Marcy Willis